Tuesday, 25 September 2012

A Very Nice Gel

In the LRB article I read about Edith Sitwell the other day, there was a reference
to an interview that Sitwell made with Marilyn Monroe. It struck me at the time that Craig Brown might want to include that meeting in any sequel to One on One that he might compile.

Unfortunately, the interview itself never saw the light of day, but in 1959 Sitwell did talk, among other things, about her fondness for Monroe. The more I learn about Sitwell, the more I like her:


There's a picture of Sitwell and Monroe together here, along with some other fascinating snaps - including Andy Warhol jogging with Grace Jones (that last bit almost warrants an exclamation mark, but I can't bring myself to use one.)



6 comments:

  1. Dame Edith's directness is beatiful ["beatiful?" almost right on beatific grounds] beautiful - because she's so utterly confident in what she's going to say.

    Marilyn Monroe in private was so much more than a sex symbol. You can't include her in a blog piece and expect me not to put my spoke in.

    I loved those photos of other celebrities on the same page as well. John Lennon looks totally disembodied. Grace Jones and Andy Warhol jogging together? Wow. I suspect the conversation wouldn't be in the Sitwell league but I wonder what they talked about.

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    1. In that photograph of Monroe with Sitwell she looks more than usually radiant, I think. I do wish I could find a transcript of their actual interview - spiked apparently because the person who'd commissioned it had hoped Sitwell would be really snooty and rude about Monroe, instead of which she treated her with interest and respect and they had a proper conversation.

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  2. What a delightful woman. I only really know Sitwell through her patronage of William Walton, but that alone reflects well on her. Most famous people are disappointing in the flesh, but I suspect that she would have been wonderful company.

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    1. The article gave the impression that she was a kind patron to quite a few people but did not always receive kindness in return.

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  3. I love Sitwell's poetry. As a student, I found it impenetrable, until I realized I was supposed to read it for the sound far more than for the sense. Not many people read her these days, but I like to hope she's primed for rediscovery.

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    1. There was a reference in the review I read to comparisons with TS Eliot's work - but the reviewer was sniffy on the subject. It might be a good subject for somebody's M. Phil

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